Stories

The 200 story nodes created in commemoration of the Sir John A. Macdonald Bicentennial can be searched by more than twenty themes, through the pins on the interactive map and by date on the timeline. 

You're viewing 7 stories about “Important Visitors
In the left corner, the windows of the rooms turned into jail cells at Fort Henry have been barred. Watercolour by Lt. George St. Vincent Whitemore of the Royal Engineers, 1841. Source: National Archives of Canada.

The 1838 Escape from Fort Henry

June 29, 1838.

On June 29th, 1838 the prisoners of the Rebellion in Upper Canada escaped through one of Fort Henry’s underground chambers.

Newcourt House

Newcourt House

1842

During the First Capital, the Honorable Hamilton H.

Charles Dickens on Fort Henry

Charles Dickens on Fort Henry

May, 1842

On his 1842 visit to Kingston, Charles Dickens made the following observations, recorded in American Notes, about Fort Henry: "There is a bomb-proof fort here of great strength, which occu

Charles Dickens on Kingston Penitentiary

Charles Dickens on Kingston Penitentiary

May, 1842

On his 1842 visit to Kingston, Charles Dickens made the following observations, recorded in American Notes, about Kingston Penitentiary:

Charles Dickens Visits Kingston

Charles Dickens Visits Kingston

May, 1842

In May of 1842, following an extensive trip to the United States, Charles Dickens made a short trip through parts of Canada beginning in Niagara Falls, passing through Cobourg and Kingston and then

Sir John's Study at Earnscliffe in “The Dominion Illustrated,” 20 June 1891. Source: Library and Archives Canada.

British High Commissioners to Canada

1930 - present

Since 1930, British High Commissioners to Canada have had to learn a great deal about Sir John A. Macdonald.