Voting Rights for First Peoples

1867-1960
In Hiawatha Council Hall on occasion of federal by-election on October 31, 1960 by Nick Nickels. From left to right: Lawrence Salleby; Chief Ralph Loucks, deputy returning officer; Lucy Muskrat, poll clerk; Eldon Muskrat, poll constable. Source: Library and Archives Canada.Pinterest
In Hiawatha Council Hall on occasion of federal by-election on October 31, 1960 by Nick Nickels. From left to right: Lawrence Salleby; Chief Ralph Loucks, deputy returning officer; Lucy Muskrat, poll clerk; Eldon Muskrat, poll constable. Source: Library and Archives Canada.

Under the leadership of Sir John A. Macdonald, limited voting rights are extended to some First Peoples men. Those granted the right to vote must be "enfranchised"  requiring them to give up both their treaty rights and Indian status. A few First Peoples men received the right to vote in 1917 under the Military Voters Act. Following the Second World War, the right to vote was extended to all First Peoples, though the government still required these voters to give up part of their treaty rights. It wasn't until 1960, under Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, that the unconditional right to vote was granted to all First Peoples.