Sir John A.'s First Vote

1836
The parliament buildings of Upper Canada, designed by Thomas Rogers and constructed between 1829 and 1832, stood at Front and Simcoe streets. York/Toronto, Canada by John George Howard. Source: City of Toronto,Toronto Culture, Museums and Heritage Services.Pinterest
The parliament buildings of Upper Canada, designed by Thomas Rogers and constructed between 1829 and 1832, stood at Front and Simcoe streets. York/Toronto, Canada by John George Howard. Source: City of Toronto,Toronto Culture, Museums and Heritage Services.

When John A. was 21, Hugh Macdonald transferred the ownership of 100 acres of land to his son giving him the right to vote in the 1836 election – and vote he did for Conservative candidate John S. Cartwright. Ownership of land and the ability to prove that ownership were, then, necessary to be eligible to vote and the mass quantity of new deeds processed in the months leading up to the election for Conservative supporters was a major controversy in the 1836 election. In the following two years, John A. faced John S. Cartwright in court and was victorious in obtaining the acquital of eight Kingston men on charges of treason.